Last edited by Malazahn
Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

1 edition of Third annual report of the Inverness District Lunatic Asylum found in the catalog.

Third annual report of the Inverness District Lunatic Asylum

May 1867

by Inverness District Lunatic Asylum

  • 320 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Printed at the Courier Office in Inverness .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Psychiatric Hospitals,
  • Inverness District Lunatic Asylum

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsCox, James, Browne, W. A. F., Aitken, Thomas
    The Physical Object
    Pagination35 pages ;
    Number of Pages35
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26475888M

    The register covers patients admitted to an asylum in Scotland in this period as well as nearly patients in asylums on 1 January The original registers include the following information: Admission Number: unique to an individual carried through from the first to subsequent admissions and other records in the MC Series held by the. HISTORY OF INVERNESS HOSPITALS - LAUNCH OF THE BOOK Report and photos by Dave Conner. Other illustration (book cover) courtesy of its authors. Today (3rd March) I was privileged to attend as an invited guest the launch of Jim & Steve Leslie's new book "The Hospitals of Inverness".

    Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain III. Southern and Western District, Third Report (Parl. Papers, , XXXI), p; Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain III. Southern and Western District, Sixth Report (Parl. Papers, Session 2, V), p; Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain III. The Health Service Executive has donated the archive of St Dympna’s Hospital, Carlow, to the Delany Archive, based at Carlow College. St Dympna’s, originally known as Carlow District Lunatic Asylum, opened in May and originally catered for mentally ill patients from counties Kildare, Wexford, Carlow and Kilkenny, and the city of Kilkenny.

      Details of , lunatic asylum patients published online for the first time The records of those committed to mental institutions during the 19th century and early 20th century have been. The report went on to point out that Ireland had excellent District Lunatic Asylums and urged legislation to ‘remove so heavy a burden from the county’. 33 In Dr Thomas Lawes Rogers, Cleaton's successor at Rainhill, who held the post of superintendent between and , noted that two-fifths of the asylum's inmates were Irish.


Share this book
You might also like
Osborn Bergin

Osborn Bergin

Physiology of tree crops

Physiology of tree crops

Digital microelectronics.

Digital microelectronics.

Old Testament

Old Testament

Pinny in the Snow

Pinny in the Snow

Testament of Subhas Bose

Testament of Subhas Bose

Philosophical essays

Philosophical essays

Head anatomy pertinent to dentistry and denture prosthesis

Head anatomy pertinent to dentistry and denture prosthesis

Sign of Chaos

Sign of Chaos

Empires of ancient Mesopotamia

Empires of ancient Mesopotamia

Faith for tough times

Faith for tough times

Gallathea, 1592.

Gallathea, 1592.

Low cost implantation into silicon

Low cost implantation into silicon

In the broken curve

In the broken curve

Third annual report of the Inverness District Lunatic Asylum by Inverness District Lunatic Asylum Download PDF EPUB FB2

OCLC Number: Notes: Consists of a list of members of the District Board of Lunacy and asylum officers, reports of the Commissioners in Lunacy (James Cox, W.A.F.

Browne), abstract of the proceedings of the house and visiting committee, report of. Inverness Courier, 16 Junep Sources: Records of the former Inverness District Asylum can be seen at the Highland Archive Centre in Inverness The Builder, 6 Aug. p Architect & Building News, 8 Aprilp Highland Health Board Archives, Booklet on hospital.

of the large Victorian public asylum that was opened in and named Inverness District Lunatic Asylum. To this day, many families in the Highlands and Islands have memories of relatives or friends who were patients or employees in the institution that served as an asylum and mental hospital for one hundred and thirty six years.

Inverness District Asylum records are part of the Highland Health Board collection held at the Highland Archive Centre in Inverness. This comprehensive set of records provides details on staff and patients as well as the history and development of Inverness District Asylum, also known as Craig Dunain.

Craig Dunain (Inverness District Lunatic Asylum) The Asylum minutes, reports and other records held by Highland Archive Service are extensive.

General Board of Control for Scotland – Annual Reports National Library of Scotland. The Board of Control inspected all psychiatric hospitals annually and produced a general report. 1 The Twenty Third Annual Report of the North Wales Counties Lunatic Asylum, Denbigh: for the year (William Hughes, ), p.

2 Commissioners in Lunacy Patients’ Book, (Highland Archive Centre, Inverness, HHB/3/2/2/2). Archives from Craig Dunain hospital in Inverness have been placed in the city's new Highland Archive Centre. the Northern Counties District Lunatic Asylum opened, and became known as. Stirling District Asylum – much smaller in size to that in Aberdeen – holds 35 pictures of patients who stayed there between and They are now housed in Stirling University.

8 Eighth Annual Report of the Inverness District Asylum, for the year ending May (Highland Archive Centre, Inverness, HHB/3/2/1/3), p. 9 Second Annual Report of the General Board of Commissioners in Lunacy for Scotland (Thomas Constable, ), p.

(Highland Archive Centre, Iverness, HHB/3/19/1/1). MONTROSE ROYAL LUNATIC ASYLUM (demolished) The Montrose Asylum was the first such institution to be founded in Scotland. Its foundation was largely due to Susan Carnegie of Charleton who was moved by the plight of lunatics imprisoned in Montrose Tollbooth.

With Provost Christie, Mrs Carnegie organized subscriptions to fund the establishment of an asylum. Fourth annual report of the Inverness District Lunatic Asylum:May Fourth annual report of the Manchester Royal Lunatic Hospital, (situate near Cheadle, Cheshire,) for the.

Kilkenny District Lunatic Asylum: First Annual Report, for County and City of Kilkenny, to 31st March, Criminal and Private Lunatic Asylums in: With Report of the Inspectors, with appendices. Blue Book, pp Reviewed.

Published: () Kilkenny District Lunatic Asylum: Third Annual Report for year ended 31st March, p. For the moment, the pages contain details of all licensed institutions operating when the report of the Royal Lunacy Commission was being prepared.

The commission visited each licensed institution in Scotland, and the appendices of the report contain accounts of each of their visits, the text of which is to be found in these pages.

Philo, C () Scaling the asylum: three geographies of the Inverness District Lunatic Asylum (Craig Dunain).

In: Topp, L, Moran, JE, Andrews, J (eds) Madness, Architecture and the Built Environment: Psychiatric Spaces in Historical Context. London: Routledge, – Google Scholar. New book, Asylum, is a record of Empty shell: Glasgow District Pauper Lunatic Asylum at Gartloch Hospital, Scotland.

Many of the buildings featured in the book. In the magistrates of the Home District called for some more humane form of treatment. After nine years of wrangling, the legislature authorized “the erection of an asylum within the Province for the reception of Insane and Lunatic persons,” and.

39 pages ; 22 cm Consists of a list of members of the District Board of Lunacy and asylum officers, report of the Commissioner in Lunacy (James Coxe), abstract of the proceedings of the house and visiting committee, report of the medical superintendent (Thos.

Aitken), resumé of cases in which post mortem examinations were made during the year and statistical tables. Locating Records for this institution.

For people admitted to Scottish Mental Health institutions from 1 January a record usually survives in the ‘Notices of Admissions by the Superintendent of the Mental Institutions’ which are held by the National Records of Scotland.

The fall of the lunatic asylum (or mental asylum) and its gradual transformation into, and eventual replacement by, the modern psychiatric hospital, explains the rise of organised, institutional there were earlier institutions that housed the "insane", the conclusion that institutionalisation was the correct solution to treating people considered to be "mad" was part of a.

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video An illustration of an audio speaker. First annual report of the Inverness District Lunatic Asylum: May Item Preview First annual report of the Inverness District Lunatic Asylum: May by Inverness District Lunatic Asylum.

Publication. Staff Records: H11/HLL/C/01 Registers of Officers of the Asylum ; H11/HLL/C/02 Applications for posts at the Asylum; H11/HLL/C/03 Letters of Recommendation and Testimonials for for Asylum Staff ; H11/HLL/C/04 Matron's Report Book ; H11/HLL/C/05 Fine Books, Female Attendants ; H11/HLL/C/Site Name Inverness, Leachkin Road, Northern Counties District Lunatic Asylum.

Classification Psychiatric Hospital (19th Century) Alternative Name(s) Craig Dunain Hospital. Canmore ID Site Number NH64SW Former District Inverness Former County Inverness-shire Archaeology Notes.

NH64SW Further Details.1 Minute of the Board of the Belfast District Lunatic Asylum, 1 June, (P.R.O.N.I., minute book of the Belfast District Lunatic Asylum, ).

2 Annual report of Armagh District Lunatic Asylum, (P.R.O.I., officiai papers,no.carton U). 3 Letter from Thomas Jackson to Henry Goulburn, 8 October, (P.R.O.I?